Keynotes

Confirmed

Toni Arndt

Toni Arndt

Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences – Sweden; President of the International Society of Biomechanics, ISB)

Cesar de Cesar Netto

Cesar de Cesar Netto

University of Iowa, Iowa City-IA - United States

Irene Davis

Irene Davis

Harvard Medical School, Cambridge - United States

Denis Bramble

Denis Bramble

University of Utah, Salt Lake City - United States

Michael Rainbow

Michael Rainbow

Queen’s University, Kingston - Canada

Theme: What’s happening in my Achilles tendon? The effects of running in different footwear

Date: April 6th - Monday

TONI ARNDT

Toni Arndt is a professor in biomechanics at the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, where he is also Dean of research. Toni is President of the International Society of Biomechanics (ISB). He has a very international background with university studies in New Zealand, Australia, Germany and Sweden. Toni’s research career has predominantly been dedicated to Achilles tendon biomechanics, foot kinematics and lower leg function, both in terms of basic and applied science.

The Collapsing Foot: Challenges in Diagnosis & Treatment & The Role of the Weight-Bearing CTs

Date: April 8th - Wednesday

CESAR DE CESAR NETTO

Dr. Cesar de Cesar Netto is an Orthopaedic Surgeon specialized in Foot and Ankle surgery. He serves as an Assistant Professor at the University of Iowa, Carver College of Medicine, in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation. He had four Clinical Fellowships in Orthopedic Foot and Ankle Surgery: University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo-SP, Brazil (2010); University of Alabama at Birmingham – UAB, Birmingham-AL (2016-2017); Hospital for Special Surgery – HSS, New York-NY (2017-2018); and Medstar Union Memorial Hospital, Baltimore-MD (2018-2019). In his research, Dr.de Cesar Netto specializes in Foot and Ankle Surgery Disorders and Imaging of the Foot and Ankle, with focus on Flatfoot Deformity, Weightbearing Computed Tomography and Achilles Tendinopathy.

The Foot Core Paradigm: Let's Think Differently about the Foot

Date: April 8th - Wednesday

Irene Davis

PhD, PT, FACSM, FAPTA, FASB
Professor, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Harvard Medical School
Director, Spaulding National Running Center

Dr. Irene Davis is the founding Director of the Spaulding National Running Center, Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Harvard Medical School. She received her Bachelors degree in Exercise Science from the University of Massachusetts, and in Physical Therapy from the University of Florida. She earned her Masters degree in Biomechanics from the University of Virginia, and her PhD in Biomechanics from Pennsylvania State University. She is a Professor Emeritus in Physical Therapy at the University of Delaware where she served on the faculty for over 20 years.

Dr. Davis’ research has focused on the relationship between lower extremity structure, mechanics and injury. Her interest in injury mechanics extends to the development of interventions to alter these mechanics through gait retraining. She is interested in the mechanics of barefoot running and its effect on injury rates, and is a barefoot runner herself. Along with gait analysis, her research encompasses dynamic imaging and modeling. She has received funding from the Department of Defense, Army Research Office and National Institutes of Health to support her research related to stress fractures. Dr. Davis has given nearly 300 lectures both nationally and internationally and authored over 100 publications on the topic of lower extremity mechanics during running.

Dr. Davis has been active professionally in the American Physical Therapy Association, the American Society of Biomechanics, and International Society of Biomechanics. She is a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, the American Society of Biomechanics, and a Catherine Worthingham Fellow of the American Physical Therapy Association. She is a past President of the American Society of Biomechanics. She has organized and coordinated international research retreats on topics of the foot and ankle, anterior cruciate ligament injuries and patellofemoral pain syndrome. She has been featured on ABC World News Tonight, Good Morning America, Discovery, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Parade and Time Magazine.

DENNIS M. BRAMBLE

Dr. Bramble is currently Emeritus Professor of Biology at the University of Utah. He received his B.A. in zoology at the University of California, Davis. His M.S. and doctoral degrees were in vertebrate paleontology from U.C. Berkeley. In addition to the University of Utah, Dr. Bramble has had academic appointments at U. C. Berkeley and the University of Illinois, Chicago. He has also served as Visiting Scholar at Harvard University.

Dr. Bramble’s primary research interest has been in the area of vertebrate form/function relationships and their biomechanical basis when studied in an evolutionary context. His studies have appeared in numerous book chapters, symposia volumes and journals, including the two leading international science magazines, Science and Nature. His 2004 cover article in Nature (with co-author Dan Lieberman) was instrumental in shifting the focus from the biomechanical demands of bipedal walking to those of endurance running as a central factor in the evolutionary emergence of the modern human body. He is a co-author of the book, Functional Vertebrate Morphology. Dr. Bramble’s approach to research has always been question oriented rather than taxon focused. For this reason, his studies have ranged widely (e.g., from the closing mechanisms of box turtles to the biomechanical integration of respiration and locomotion in humans), although integrative studies of mammalian locomotion, including its anatomical, biomechanical and physiological underpinnings, have been a central theme in his work.

Investigation of Human Foot Function Using Approaches in Imaging and Musculoskeletal Modeling

Date: April 7th - Tuesday

Michael Rainbow

Michael Rainbow received a Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering (Biomechanics) in 2012 from Brown University, and completed a postdoctoral research position in the Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital – Harvard Medical School. He is currently an Assistant Professor at Queen’s University where he established the Skeletal Observation Laboratory. His research aims to understand the relationships between form, function, and dysfunction in multi-articular joint structures of the appendicular skeleton. To accomplish this, Dr. Rainbow uses a comparative approach that involves collaboration with researchers in evolutionary biology, orthopaedics, rehabilitation, computer science, exercise science, and motor control.